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Add inline function with IF/ELSE clause in Oracle 12c


Add inline function with IF/ELSE clause in Oracle 12c

By : user2185713
Date : November 22 2020, 04:01 AM
around this issue Your if statement is missing a then after the elsif condition clause, hence the missing keyword error pointing to function f. Also, after you fix this error you may get a ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended pointing to the last semi-colon. Interestingly, the ";" does not seem to work as a terminator to the SQL statement when the PL/SQL declaration is included in the WITH clause. If we attempt to use it on its own, SQL*Plus waits for more text to be entered. So you have to end it with a / on a new line. Even in the example in SQL Reference manual uses a combination of ; and /. Here is my example I tested in PL/SQL Developer 11:
code :
WITH
 FUNCTION f(n number) return varchar2 IS
   begin
     if n<5 then 
       return 'small';
     elsif (n>5 AND n<50) then
       return 'medium';
     else 
       return 'big';
      end if;     
   end;  
select f(25) from dual
/
F(25)
medium


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Function in Where clause inside Inline Table-Valued Function

Function in Where clause inside Inline Table-Valued Function


By : Phil Cote
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
help you fix your problem I would try to make the fn_GetWarehouse and inline table valued function as well and join it on.
code :
ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_ItemInventory] (@CustomerId)
RETURNS TABLE AS
RETURN (
    SELECT 
         _Inventory.*
    FROM Inventory _Inventory
    join fn_GetWarehouse(@CustomerId) _Warehouse
        on _Warehouse.warehouse = _Inventory.Warehouse
)
Oracle SQL Function in WHERE clause takes longer to run than in SELECT clause

Oracle SQL Function in WHERE clause takes longer to run than in SELECT clause


By : yuval
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
I wish did fix the issue. How many times is the function being executed in each case?
Without seeing query plans, I would wager that the query runs quickly when the other predicates are evaluated first, paring the result set down as much as possible before the function is called. When the function is only called 93 times (plus however many additional executions are required for the rows that aren't eliminated by any other predicate) the query runs quickly. On the other hand, if the function is called earlier in the query plan, it will be called many more times--potentially once for every row in the table and the query will return much more slowly. You could validate this by looking at the query plans or using some instrumentation to measure exactly how many times the function is called in the different cases.
code :
SELECT *
FROM (
   SELECT COL1, COL2, COL3, rownum
   FROM my_table
   WHERE [CONDITIONS...]
 ) temp_tbl
 WHERE my_package.my_function(:bind_var, COL1) = 'Y';
Oracle sql inline formula vs function performance

Oracle sql inline formula vs function performance


By : Esha Mayuri
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
This might help you Yes, there is an overhead to calling user-defined functions from SQL. Search for "context switching". This can be minimised using pragma udf from 12c, or deterministic in earlier versions (or both).
For some detailed analysis of the options and their effect on performance, see:
Function in Oracle SQL where clause

Function in Oracle SQL where clause


By : TJK
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
I wish this help you A function returns a value.
In the where clause you need to compare that return value with something, e.g.
code :
SELECT * 
FROM employees emp 
WHERE emp.loc = 'US' 
AND usr.fnctn('emp_sal', :sal1, :sal2) = 42;
Oracle to SQL Server query migration results into: The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived ta

Oracle to SQL Server query migration results into: The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived ta


By : user3326648
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
it should still fix some issue You're facing two issues here.
1) As noted by a few others, the ORDER BY CREATIONDATE in the sub-query has to go.
code :
SELECT CREATIONDATE, TITLE, SUM(myindex) over (ORDER BY CREATIONDATE ROWS UNBOUNDED PRECEDING) AS cumula
FROM 
(
SELECT CREATIONDATE, TITLE, 1 as myindex
FROM CONTENT
WHERE CONTENTID in 
        (
        SELECT CONTENTID 
        FROM CONTENT_LABEL
        WHERE LABELID in (SELECT LABELID FROM LABEL WHERE name = 'retrospective')
        )
AND CONTENTTYPE = 'PAGE'
AND CONTENT_STATUS = 'current'
/*ORDER BY CREATIONDATE*/
) AS s; --<--- Five extra characters, and you should be good to go.
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