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Does a hash salt have any other use than to prevent rainbow table attacks?


Does a hash salt have any other use than to prevent rainbow table attacks?

By : Todd A. Schroeder
Date : October 18 2020, 11:12 AM
I hope this helps you . No - It only prevents rainbow table attacks. As a attacker needs to build the rainbow table for each password entry. Because the salt adds a lil spice which differentiates the password hash from all the others.
Dictionary-based and Brute-forcing attacks are essentially the same thing here. Salting doesn’t stop these as your validation algorithm is something like
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How does password salt help against a rainbow table attack?

How does password salt help against a rainbow table attack?


By : Martin Surrey
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
I wish this helpful for you A public salt will not make dictionary attacks harder when cracking a single password. As you've pointed out, the attacker has access to both the hashed password and the salt, so when running the dictionary attack, she can simply use the known salt when attempting to crack the password.
A public salt does two things: makes it more time-consuming to crack a large list of passwords, and makes it infeasible to use a rainbow table.
Does the hash algorithm used for password hashing affect rainbow table generation?

Does the hash algorithm used for password hashing affect rainbow table generation?


By : EDave
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
it should still fix some issue Enough With The Rainbow Tables: What You Need To Know About Secure Password Schemes touches on this briefly. It starts out with a mini-rant about people misunderstanding rainbow tables and the actual level of danger they present, but then turns into a good discussion of the implications of password hashing algorithm performance.
On your final question, the more direct answer is that, by examining the output alone, you can only determine the number of bits in the output of the final hashing algorithm. Depending on the algorithm, this may or may not be unique, but, if the algorithm's any good, there won't be any detectable patterns that will identify it exactly. (I say "final" because the output of MD5-only will look the same as the end result of SHA512-then-MD5, since the last step is the same in both cases.)
Are Rainbow Tables Attacks even a threat?

Are Rainbow Tables Attacks even a threat?


By : user3065891
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
help you fix your problem Yes.
Many people use the same password for everything. Compromising the original password (as opposed to simply changing it to something you know) can often give an attacker access to someone's accounts on other services.
Can salt prevent dictionary or brute force attacks?

Can salt prevent dictionary or brute force attacks?


By : Dexter121
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
hope this fix your issue Troy Hunt recently wrote an excellent article, Our password hashing has no clothes, detailing the evolution of password hashing, including Salts.
Although Salts prevented direct comparisons with pre-hashed rainbow tables, his point is that hardware has improved to the point where applying the salt to an unhashed rainbow password and comparing salted hashes can now be done in a short time due to Moore's law.
Is it more secure to prefix a password hash with a salt or to dissolve the salt within the hash?

Is it more secure to prefix a password hash with a salt or to dissolve the salt within the hash?


By : M Specht
Date : March 29 2020, 07:55 AM
will be helpful for those in need No, it does not matter assuming you are using a decent hashing algorithm. Talking of that, you should really use bcrypt for password hashing, which takes the salt as a separate parameter anyways.
However, you should not add your salt to the hash but to the password before hashing. Otherways it's pretty useless.
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